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Residual hearing preservation for cochlear implantation surgery


1 Department of Otolaryngology, Taichung Tzu Chi Hospital, Buddhist Tzu Chi Medical Foundation, Taichung; School of Medicine, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan
2 Department of Otolaryngology, Taichung Tzu Chi Hospital, Buddhist Tzu Chi Medical Foundation, Taichung, Taiwan

Correspondence Address:
Hung-Pin Wu,
Department of Otolaryngology, Taichung Tzu Chi Hospital, Buddhist Tzu Chi Medical Foundation, 88, Section 1, Fengxing Road, Tanzi District, Taichung
Taiwan
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None

DOI: 10.4103/tcmj.tcmj_181_20

Cochlear implantation (CI) has developed for more than four decades. Initially, CI was used for profound bilateral hearing impairment. However, the indications for CI have expanded in recent years to include children with symptomatic partial deafness. Therefore, CI strategies to preserve residual hearing are important for both patients and otologists. The loss of residual low-frequency hearing is thought to be the result of many factors. All surgical methods have the same goal: protect the delicate intracochlear structures and preserve residual low-frequency hearing to improve speech perception abilities. Fully opening the round window membrane, a straight electrode array, slower insertion speed, and the use of corticosteroids result in a higher rate of hearing preservation. Several factors, like the way of surgical approaches, length of arrays and timing of activation, may not affect the residual hearing preservation. Therefore, the classic atraumatic technique, including the very slow and delicate insertion and administration of intraoperative corticosteroids, can improve hearing outcomes.


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    -  Chiu T
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