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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 33  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 294-300

Test-retest reliability of subjective visual vertical measurements with lateral head tilt in virtual reality goggles


1 Department of Chinese Medicine, Taichung Tzu Chi Hospital, Buddhist Tzu Chi Medical Foundation, Taichung, Taiwan
2 Soroka University Hospital and Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel; School of Optometry, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA
3 Department of Research, Taichung Tzu Chi Hospital, Buddhist Tzu Chi Medical Foundation, Taichung, Taiwan
4 Division of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA
5 Department of Neurology, Neuro-Medical Scientific Center, Taichung Tzu Chi Hospital, Buddhist Tzu Chi Medical Foundation, Taichung; Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan

Correspondence Address:
Tzu-Pu Chang
Department of Neurology, Neuro-Medical Scientific Center, Taichung Tzu Chi Hospital, Buddhist Tzu Chi Medical Foundation, 88, Section1, Fengxing Road, Tanzi District, Taichung
Taiwan
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/tcmj.tcmj_207_20

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Objective: The objective is to investigate the test-retest reliability of subjective visual vertical (SVV) in the upright position and with lateral head tilts through a computerized SVV measuring system using virtual reality (VR) goggles. Materials and Methods: Thirty healthy controls underwent SVV test in upright position, with the head tilted to the right 30°, and with the head tilted to the left 30°. Subjects wore SVV VR goggles, which contained a gyroscope for monitoring the angle of head tilt. Each subject completed 10 adjustments in each head position. The mean value of SVV deviations and SVV imprecision (the intra-individual variability of SVV deviations from the 10 adjustments) were recorded and compared across different head positions. The participants then repeated the same SVV protocol at least 1 week later. The test-retest reliability of SVV deviation and SVV imprecision were analyzed. Results: The SVV deviation (mean ± standard deviation) was 0.22° ± 1.56° in upright position, −9.64° ± 5.91° in right head tilt, and 7.20° ± 6.36° in left head tilt. The test-retest reliability of SVV deviation was excellent in upright position (intra-class correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0.77, P < 0.001), right head tilt (ICC = 0.83, P < 0.001) and left head tilt (ICC = 0.84, P < 0.001). The SVV values from the 10 adjustments made during right and left head tilts were less precise than when measured at upright (P < 0.001). The test-retest reliability of SVV imprecision was poor at upright (ICC = 0.21, P = 0.26) but fair-to-good in right head tilt (ICC = 0.72, P < 0.001) and left head tilt (ICC = 0.44, P = 0.04). Conclusion: The test-retest reliability of SVV deviation during lateral head tilts via VR goggles is excellent, which supports further research into the diagnostic value of head-tilt SVV in various vestibular disorders. In addition, the degree of SVV imprecision during head tilt has fair-to-good test-retest reliability, which suggests SVV imprecision may have clinical applicability.


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